The name's Louise.
I drink tea and play percussion, in that order.

Install Theme

gonewiththegershwind:

khrysdiebee:

tastefullyoffensive:

Deep Sea Animals With Googly Eyes [original images via wordss]

Previously: Book Covers With Googly Eyes

I’m just gonna go ahead and reblog this again…

HEH

rudeboystaxx:

Ha. #schroeder #lucy #musician #piano

rudeboystaxx:

Ha. #schroeder #lucy #musician #piano

(via la-fin-du-temps)

homilius:

visualizingmath:

Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler, 1619
In Harmonices Mundi (1619) Kepler attempted to explain the harmony of the world and contained what is known today as his third law. The work was founded on geometry, from which Kepler derived first a theory of musical harmony and then a cosmology of the heavens and the earth. Kepler attempted to find common rules between music and movement in the solar system. His music of the spheres is based on the relative maximum and minimum angular velocities of the planet measured from the sun. Using his theories, Kepler allotted to the planets musical intervals and musical motion.
“The Earth sings Mi, Fa, Mi: you may infer even from the syllables that in this our home misery and famine hold sway" -Kepler.
Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.
Prints of Harmonices Mundi are available here. Does anyone know what “Hiclocum haber eriam” means?

Answer to the question: It’s hic locum habet etiam (This [celestial body] always holds this place). It’s the moon.

homilius:

visualizingmath:

Harmonices Mundi (Harmony of the World) by Johannes Kepler, 1619

In Harmonices Mundi (1619) Kepler attempted to explain the harmony of the world and contained what is known today as his third law. The work was founded on geometry, from which Kepler derived first a theory of musical harmony and then a cosmology of the heavens and the earth. Kepler attempted to find common rules between music and movement in the solar system. His music of the spheres is based on the relative maximum and minimum angular velocities of the planet measured from the sun. Using his theories, Kepler allotted to the planets musical intervals and musical motion.

The Earth sings Mi, Fa, Mi: you may infer even from the syllables that in this our home misery and famine hold sway" -Kepler.

Johannes Kepler (1571-1630) was a German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. A key figure in the 17th century scientific revolution, he is best known for his laws of planetary motion based on his works Astronomia nova, Harmonices Mundi, and Epitome of Copernican Astronomy. These works also provided one of the foundations for Isaac Newton’s theory of universal gravitation.

Prints of Harmonices Mundi are available here. Does anyone know what “Hiclocum haber eriam” means?

Answer to the question: It’s hic locum habet etiam (This [celestial body] always holds this place). It’s the moon.

(via beethoven)

One of the things I missed most about being home is my espresso machine.

syosama:

reblog if you are your url

(via tumorsandmusic)

easied:

if trees could talk i’d probably get emotionally attached to them

until then, let’s continue cutting them down.

(via tessa-rae)

deceptivecadenza:

how do i become an music?

deceptivecadenza:

how do i become an music?

(via anotherpianist)

for-the-love-of-classical-music:

stockphotosofviolinists:

The only time when it’s probably ok to beat the conductor to the downbeat

reblog for the caption

for-the-love-of-classical-music:

stockphotosofviolinists:

The only time when it’s probably ok to beat the conductor to the downbeat

reblog for the caption

(via mahleriana)

unamusedsloth:

Looks like he found some amazing cereal

unamusedsloth:

Looks like he found some amazing cereal

(via radravel)

things on my mind: what I learned this summer working at christian music camp

I learned to enjoy playing drum set. This is a big deal for me. I’ve always disliked drum set for some reason that I couldn’t quite pinpoint. I think it was just because I hadn’t played it that much, aside from in private lessons. This was the first time I had ever performed on drum set, and was depended upon whilst playing. I played quite a bit this summer, and I realized that maybe I just needed to spend some time on the drum set getting to know it in a different context than a private lesson. It also didn’t hurt that all of the kids looked up to me and thought I was the best drummer since sliced bread. Someone even wrote that I was the “batoven of drummers”. Too adorable.

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Day fourteen.

It’s over! The final concert included Telemann’s Water Music, Wagner’s Wotan’s Farewell and Magic Fire Music, and Strauss’ Alpine Symphony. Strauss is definitely becoming one of my favorites.

The gnome was sitting on the organ during the concert. I’m not sure why, but I don’t really care why.

It’s been a good two weeks. And now that that’s over, I’ll see you in five weeks, tumblr.

Day thirteen!
My parents were able to come up and watch the evening concert. John William’s Escapades from Catch Me If You Can, Smetana’s Moldau, and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1. Each piece got a standing ovation, and at the end of the concert when Hans Richter, our guest conductor, recognized the percussion section, we got the loudest applause. They really do love us here.
I must say, I really nailed the timpani part in the Moldau. I’ve never been that nervous excited for any kind of large ensemble performance before.
They’re sending the recordings of last night’s concert to NPR! I’ll have to keep my eyes peeled.
I couldn’t get a good internet connection last night, so I had to wait until this morning.

Day thirteen!

My parents were able to come up and watch the evening concert. John William’s Escapades from Catch Me If You Can, Smetana’s Moldau, and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1. Each piece got a standing ovation, and at the end of the concert when Hans Richter, our guest conductor, recognized the percussion section, we got the loudest applause. They really do love us here.

I must say, I really nailed the timpani part in the Moldau. I’ve never been that nervous excited for any kind of large ensemble performance before.

They’re sending the recordings of last night’s concert to NPR! I’ll have to keep my eyes peeled.

I couldn’t get a good internet connection last night, so I had to wait until this morning.

pixahl:

when people ask me what my fave color is I’m just gonna say cosmic latte.

pixahl:

when people ask me what my fave color is I’m just gonna say cosmic latte.

(via fabfalafel)